Ken Thomas is a professional photographer serving all of the North Carolina and South Carolina regions. Specializing in weddings and events, bridal portraits, engagement pictures and family lifestyle photography. For more information or to setup an appointment to visit the studio please give me a call any day from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Please let me know how I can be of any help to you!

 

Click HERE to Call or Text: 704-467-4343

 

Click HERE to Email: ktphotof8@gmail.com

 

Booking Now for 2015 & 2016!

 





Click HERE to Call or Text: 704-467-4343


Click HERE to Email: ktphotof8@gmail.com


Studio Location:


Historic Union St. South, Concord NC 28025


Kannapolis N.C. 28083



Please call to setup an appointment to visit the studio.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH!! WE WON THE WEDDINGWIRE COUPLES' CHOICE AWARD FOR 2015!!

The WeddingWire Couples' Choice Awards® recognizes the top 5 percent of local Wedding Professionals from the WeddingWire Network throughout the United States, Canada and abroad that demonstrate excellence in quality, service, responsiveness and professionalism. Unlike other awards in which winners are selected by the organization, the WeddingWire Couples' Choice Awards® are awarded solely based on the reviews from over 200,000 newlyweds. Awards are determined by a combination of excellence in four factors: overall rating (quality), total number of reviews (quantity), review performance from 2014 (recency), and consistency of reviews from year to year (consistency).

In the course of a wedding day a wedding photographer is an architectural photographer, documenting the wedding location; a portrait photographer, flattering the wedding day key players; a product photographer, shooting a close-up of the wedding rings; and a photojournalist, telling the story of your special day with pictures.

My mission statement

If you are planning your wedding or any event, let me help you make it a day you will remember forever. My mission is to provide you with photographs so that day will always be special in your memory. I will be there to capture every emotional, humorous, and touching moment that will make your day special.


--- Now Booking for 2015 & 2016 ---




--- Wedding Packages Starting at $1390.00 ---





-- With more than 20 years of photography experience and over 300 weddings shot, you will have the peace of mind that your most important day is entrusted to an professional. You will receive beautiful, high quality images that capture your precious memories.

-- Click the call button below any Monday-Friday from 9 AM to 8 PM for a quick 10 minute consultation and receive by email all the details of your custom wedding day package. I look forward to speaking with you.


Click HERE to Call or Text: 704-467-4343



Click HERE to Email: ktphotof8@gmail.com

Before Your Dream Day Bridal Portrait Session

Nothing expresses beauty and elegance the way a bridal portrait does and it will be a heirloom to be treasured for years to come! Sessions may be done in my studio or outdoors at one of my beautiful on location spots, or a favorite location of your choice.

Before Your Dream Day Engagement Portrait Session

Couples engagement portraits are an important part of your wedding story and can be used for newspaper announcements, gift registering, gifts for family and friends, and of course wedding invitations. You may even choose to include a few images to be used in your wedding album(s). Sessions may be done in my studio or outdoors at one of my beautiful on location spots, or a favorite location of your choice.

Engagement and Bridal Portrait Upgrade Special $299.00



-- 2 hour Engagement portrait session.

-- 2 hour Bridal portrait session.

-- In studio or on location photo sessions.

-- Unlimited photographs taken.

-- Two 16x20 prints mounted on art board, framed and displayed on easels at your wedding.

-- One 16x20 framed signature board with 5x7 or 8x10 center mounted print.

-- Password protected online Gallery to view and share your pictures.

-- This package must be booked with a wedding package.

-- For more information about booking this package or to setup an appointment with the studio to see my work in person please call any day from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.


Click HERE to Call or Text: 704-467-4343



Click HERE to Email: ktphotof8@gmail.com

Destination Weddings


While the majority of my work is in the North & South Carolina regions, I am also available to travel anywhere to photograph your wedding or special event. For a quick 10 mintue quote over the phone or to set an appointment to see my work in person, please call me any day from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. or email me at any time.


Click HERE to Call or Text: 704-467-4343



Click HERE to Email: ktphotof8@gmail.com

Online ordering and proofing Gallery.

Password protected online Gallery for you, your family and friends to view and order prints. Included with all of our wedding packages, your friends and family will receive a special online price on any prints,

Real photographic paper, no inkjet here.

Your portraits will be printed on Kodak professional Endura paper. It's the finest photographic paper and has been designed to preserve your priceless memories. Display and store your portraits with confidence, because they will be printed on real photographic paper that will last for generations.

You receive the copyright release.

Even though customers pay hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars up front to have photos taken at their weddings, the copyright of their photographs is retained by the photographer. You will receive a DVD of all your images and you will be able to post your pictures on any social networks without restrictions and without the photographer logo on your pictures. The copyright release also gives you the ability to make your own reprints or enlargements anytime you want, either on your home printer or at a professional photo lab. Copyright release included with Silver wedding package and up. No logo on any of your images.

Included with any portrait or wedding package. Photo gallery APP for your mobile device to view and share your pictures.

We accept Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover.

Not just a wedding photographer

As well as wedding photography, we also do all types of portrait photography. engagement photos, family portraits, high-school senior photos, and modeling portfolios. We are also available to take photos at special events, including wedding anniversaries, bar mitzvahs, bat mitzvahs, company parties, or children's birthdays.

Ken Thomas Photography on Facebook.com

Reviews

Chad and I wanted to thank you for doing such a wonderful job with our photos! Ken does more than excellent work, he becomes your friend. We were so pleased with all of our pictures of the Engagement, Bridal Shots, Rehearsal Dinner, and most important of all the Wedding!!! We would highly recommend him to do any type of photos you would love to cherish! He is AWESOME!!!!! Thank you again Ken, you will forever be in my life as the best photographer ever!!!!

Wendy Bishop


We justed wanted to let you know we enjoyed your photos of our wedding day..You really captured every moment important to us. We wish you the best!! May God grant you the desires of your heart.

Much love and appreciation,

The Adams


I just wanted to let you know what a great time Scott and I had taking pictures with you on our wedding day. You are a very talented individual and we wish you all the best in your future endeavors.

Sincerely,
Mr. & Mrs. Scott Young


Hey Ken,
Just wanted to drop by and say again that we LOVE our pics. Everyone talks about how beautiful they are and we are very happy. Thanks for all your work!!!

Shannon Morris

Ken! The pictures are awesome! (We really didn't expect anything less!) Even my dad was telling someone at church (before we got them back) that "if he did half the job on the wedding that he did on their engagement and her bridal pictures, they are going to be perfect!"
So you have ALL THUMBS UP from the Parker, Hayes, and Jackson families!!!

Thank you again for everything!

Leslie Jackson

Reviews

Ken you rock. Our wedding will not be the last time you see us, I promise. I am in love with your work. I am not a fan of having my pic taken and either is Corey, but you made our pictures look so natural and fun. You also made us very relaxed and comfortable along with all of our guests. You were very professional but also a lot of fun.

Amelia Casey


Hello Ken, Thank you so much for everything that you did. The wedding album you made for us is wonderful, everyone says they never seen anything like it before. I appreciate all the hard work that you put into it. I am glad to see that my best friend booked you to do her wedding, I knew that she would after she saw my album.
We will be telling everyone about you.

Jacqueline and Matt


Ken, I wanna thank you so much for the wedding pictures you took..They are so beautiful, everyone loves them..I sent Shannon some in Afganistan, he said to tell you " Good Job, Thank you"..We both wanna thank you again..Job well done..

Noelle


We just love our new engagement photos. We were so worried about how they would turn out because we arent always the most photogenic pair, but you made us so comfortable -- it really shows!
Thanks again, and cant wait til you capture the wedding!

-Jessica & Ryan


The photos were outstanding!! Everyone loves them and we can't express in words how happy we are with them!! Thanks for going above and beyond to not only take great pictures but to make everyone comfortable! As I said before, JR and I have and will recommend you to anyone who is needing photos!

JR & Amanda Davis


The pictures were wonderful and were a great price. Very good quality, everyone loves them! Thanks so much, we have will be recommending you to anyone we know that is getting married.

Mandy and Corey


We just received the photo album and everything looks great!!! They look good on-line and even better in person. You went above and beyond our expectations.

Thanks again,
The Adams




Would like to learn more about Ken Thomas Photography?--> Click here.

Complete your perfect day with perfect music.

Please click below to visit my friends April and Megan Dean. April and Megan have been playing professionally at weddings and other events across the East Coast since 2000. Their experience playing as a sister-duo makes them uniquely capable to plan your ceremony or event according to your personal style and taste.

Click here.

Charlotte Video Ventures

Visit my friend Michael Albert at Charlotte Video Ventures. Click here.

The Lakes Kannapolis N.C.

Please visit my friends at The Lakes. It's such a beautiful place to have your wedding. Let them help you plan the wedding that you have always dreamed of. You can also visit their location to see a display of my photography work.
Click here.

Carolinas Elite Realty

Are you looking to buy or sell a home in Charlotte North Carolina or it's surrounding areas? Contact Judy Thomas today for all your real estate needs! Click here.

The Jewelry Mine Concord NC

Visit my friends at The Jewelry Mine inside the Carolina Mall, Concord N.C. They have a great selection of engagement rings, wedding jewelry, wedding party gifts and much more.

Choosing a Wedding Photographer

Choosing wedding photographers to capture your big day is probably one of the top items on your wedding planning list. The photographer’s role is an important one, as he or she is responsible for conveying the feeling of that day and creating lasting keepsakes for you and your beloved to cherish for years to come. As you begin your search for a wedding photographer, consider these tips along the way.

1. Make a Match

When choosing a wedding photographer, you should consider each professional's style. Wedding photographers specialize in all different kinds of styles, so it's best to ask plenty of questions regarding their specialties. For instance, some photographers work best with environmental shots while others are great at capturing action and movement. Some shutterbugs may work exclusively with black and white film and others prefer color. Before you call around to schedule a consultation, determine what details are most important to you for what you would like your photographer to be able to do.

2. Wrangle up Referrals

A great way to find quality service providers is to ask around for referrals. This is also true for finding a wedding photographer. Contact friends and family to see who they’ve used for their wedding, and look through their photo albums to get a feel for the strengths and weaknesses of the photographers they hired. If you’re having trouble finding someone through word of mouth, use the Internet as a go-to source for discovering wedding photographers in your area. Most photographers have Web sites where clients can browse galleries of their work. If you like what you see, don’t hesitate to call and schedule a time to meet with the wedding photographer you desire.

3. Review Their Work

All photographers should have a portfolio of their work. Ask to see this when you schedule your visit. It's important to look at an entire body of work, as well as snapshots and single pictures to ensure the photographer's consistency.
Some things to look for when reviewing a wedding photographer's portfolio are: Does he or she use good lighting?
Does he or she capture a variety of poses in each shot (sitting, standing, walking, etc.)
Are photos of professional grade/quality?
Does each album convey a different theme and mood, or do they all look the same?

4. The Right Equipment

Brush up on your photography lingo to find out the type of equipment photographers use. Many photographers are discontinuing the use of film and turning to digital cameras, due to its on-the-spot viewing features and editing capabilities. However, there are wedding photographers who continue to use film as their tried and true format. If you choose a photographer who shoots in digital, ask if they are able to upload wedding photos to the Web so that your friends, family and other guests can browse your gallery online.

5. Price Points

The price of a seasoned wedding photographers can run you upwards of several thousand dollars. Prices typically include time spent shooting pictures at the wedding and/or reception, photo development, retouches and edits, and creating the wedding album. If you are working with a limited budget, ask about pricing of basic packages that include pictures from a standard shot list. Some wedding photographers work by the hour, so it's best to ask them to come only at designated times.

6. Before You Sign . . .

With any service agreement, there should be a written contract stating the services you are to receive, costs associated with services and all other important details. Your wedding photography contract should also state the time you would like the photographer to arrive at the desired locations, and addresses where the ceremony and reception will take place.
As you can see, there are a few things to keep in mind when choosing a wedding photographer. However, following these steps will keep you on track while searching for a wedding photographers to commemorate your wedding day.

SOURCE: Perfect Wedding Guide



Click HERE to Call or Text: 704-467-4343


Click HERE to Email: ktphotof8@gmail.com


Studio Location:


Historic Union St. South, Concord NC 28025


Kannapolis N.C. 28083



Please call to setup an appointment to visit the studio.

Would like to learn more adout Ken Thomas Photography?--> Click here.

Thank you for visiting my website. If you have any questions, send me an e-mail or give me a call or text anytime between 9:00am till 8:00pm.

Ken Thomas is a professional photographer serving all of the North Carolina and South Carolina regions. Specializing in weddings and events, bridal portraits, engagement pictures and family lifestyle photography. For more information or to setup an appointment time to visit the studio please give us a call any day from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. at 704-467-4343. Please let us know how we can be of any help to you! Charlotte, NC. Kannapolis, NC. Concord, NC. Salisbury, NC. Landis, NC. China Grove, NC. Huntersville, NC Raleigh, NC. Greensboro, NC. Wilmington NC. Lexington, NC. High Point, NC. Winston-Salem, NC. Greensboro, NC. Mooresville, NC. Statesville, NC. Badin, NC. Matthews, NC. Mint Hill, NC. Monroe, NC. Cornelius, NC. Mt. Airy, NC. Yadkinville, NC. Gastonia, NC. Myrtle Beach, SC. Pageland, SC. Charleston, SC. Columbia, SC. Hilton Head, SC. All of North Carolina and South Carolina.

Choosing a Wedding Photographer


Choosing wedding photographers to capture your big day is probably one of the top items on your wedding planning list. The photographer’s role is an important one, as he or she is responsible for conveying the feeling of that day and creating lasting keepsakes for you and your beloved to cherish for years to come. As you begin your search for a wedding photographer, consider these tips along the way.

1. Make a Match

When choosing a wedding photographer, you should consider each professional's style. Wedding photographers specialize in all different kinds of styles, so it's best to ask plenty of questions regarding their specialties. For instance, some photographers work best with environmental shots while others are great at capturing action and movement. Some shutterbugs may work exclusively with black and white film and others prefer color. Before you call around to schedule a consultation, determine what details are most important to you for what you would like your photographer to be able to do.

2. Wrangle up Referrals

A great way to find quality service providers is to ask around for referrals. This is also true for finding a wedding photographer. Contact friends and family to see who they’ve used for their wedding, and look through their photo albums to get a feel for the strengths and weaknesses of the photographers they hired. If you’re having trouble finding someone through word of mouth, use the Internet as a go-to source for discovering wedding photographers in your area. Most photographers have Web sites where clients can browse galleries of their work. If you like what you see, don’t hesitate to call and schedule a time to meet with the wedding photographer you desire.

3. Review Their Work

All photographers should have a portfolio of their work. Ask to see this when you schedule your visit. It's important to look at an entire body of work, as well as snapshots and single pictures to ensure the photographer's consistency.
Some things to look for when reviewing a wedding photographer's portfolio are:Does he or she use good lighting?
Does he or she capture a variety of poses in each shot (sitting, standing, walking, etc.)

Are photos of professional grade/quality?

Does each album convey a different theme and mood, or do they all look the same?

4. The Right Equipment

Brush up on your photography lingo to find out the type of equipment photographers use. Many photographers are discontinuing the use of film and turning to digital cameras, due to its on-the-spot viewing features and editing capabilities. However, there are wedding photographers who continue to use film as their tried and true format. If you choose a photographer who shoots in digital, ask if they are able to upload wedding photos to the Web so that your friends, family and other guests can browse your gallery online.

5. Price Points

The price of a seasoned wedding photographers can run you upwards of several thousand dollars. Prices typically include time spent shooting pictures at the wedding and/or reception, photo development, retouches and edits, and creating the wedding album. If you are working with a limited budget, ask about pricing of basic packages that include pictures from a standard shot list. Some wedding photographers work by the hour, so it's best to ask them to come only at designated times.

6. Before You Sign . . .

With any service agreement, there should be a written contract stating the services you are to receive, costs associated with services and all other important details. Your wedding photography contract should also state the time you would like the photographer to arrive at the desired locations, and addresses where the ceremony and reception will take place.
As you can see, there are a few things to keep in mind when choosing a wedding photographer. However, following these steps will keep you on track while searching for a wedding photographers to commemorate your wedding day.

SOURCE http://www.perfectweddingguide.com/

.

Photography is the science, art and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film.



The definitions of amateur and professional, in the context of photography, are not entirely categorical. A professional photographer is likely to take photographs to make money, through the display, sale or use of those photographs, while an amateur photographer may take photographs for pleasure and to record an event, emotion, place, as a person without a monetary motivation. However, much photography is preparatory to other activity, or forms a partial but significant part of a person's job role; for example, a scene of crime detective, a ship's photographer in the (Royal Navy), a reporter on a local paper or an estate agent, while an amateur may make considerable sums entering work for prize money or through occasional inclusion of their work in magazines or the archive of an agency. The term professional may also imply preparation, for example, by academic study, of the photographer in pursuit of photographic skills. There is no compulsory registration requirement for professional photographer status, so ambivalent or overlapping concepts apply here as they do in other areas of unregulated artistic activity, such as painting or writing.

A professional photographer may be an employee, for example of a newspaper, or may contract to cover a particular event such as a wedding or graduation, or to illustrate an advertisement. Others, including paparazzi and fine art photographers, are freelancers, first making a picture and then offering it for sale or display. Some workers, such as policemen, estate agents, journalists and scientists, make photographs as part of other work. Photographers who produce moving rather than still pictures are often called cinematographers, videographers or camera operators, depending on the commercial context.

Photographers are also categorized based on the subjects they photograph. Some photographers explore subjects typical of paintings such as landscape, still life, and portraiture. Other photographers specialize in subjects unique to photography, including street photography, documentary photography, fashion photography, wedding photography, war photography, photojournalism, aviation photography and commercial photography. The exclusive right of photographers to copy and use their products is protected by copyright. Countless industries purchase photographs for use in publications and on products. The photographs seen on magazine covers, in television advertising, on greeting cards or calendars, on websites, or on products and packages, have generally been purchased for this use, either directly from the photographer or through an agency that represents the photographer. A photographer uses a contract to sell the "license" or use of his or her photograph with exact controls regarding how often the photograph will be used, in what territory it will be used (for example U.S. or U.K. or other), and exactly for which products. This is usually referred to as usage fee and is used to distinguish from production fees (payment for the actual creation of a photograph or photographs). An additional contract and royalty would apply for each additional use of the photograph.

The time duration of the contract may be for one year or other duration. The photographer usually charges a royalty as well as a one-time fee, depending on the terms of the contract. The contract may be for non-exclusive use of the photograph (meaning the photographer can sell the same photograph for more than one use during the same year) or for exclusive use of the photograph (i.e. only that company may use the photograph during the term). The contract can also stipulate that the photographer is entitled to audit the company for determination of royalty payments. Royalties vary depending on the industry buying the photograph and the use, for example, royalties for a photograph used on a poster or in television advertising may be higher than the royalty for use on a limited run of brochures. A royalty is also often based on the size the photo will be used in a magazine or book and cover photos usually command higher fees than photos used elsewhere in a book or magazine.

Photos taken by a photographer while working on assignment often belong to the company or publication unless stipulated otherwise by contract. Professional portrait and wedding photographers often stipulate by contract that they retain the copyright on wedding photos or portrait photos, so that only they can sell further prints of the photographs to the consumer, rather than the customer reproducing the photos by other means. If the customer wishes to be able to reproduce the photos themselves, they may discuss an alternative contract with the photographer in advance before the pictures are taken, in which a larger up front fee may be paid in exchange for reprint rights passing to the customer.

There are major companies who have maintained catalogues of stock photography and images for decades, such as Getty Images and others. Since the turn of the 21st century many online stock photography catalogues have appeared that invite photographers to sell their photos online easily and quickly, but often for very little money, without a royalty, and without control over the use of the photo, the market it will be used in, the products it will be used on, time duration, etc.
Photography is the science, art and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film.[1]

Typically, a lens is used to focus the light reflected or emitted from objects into a real image on the light-sensitive surface inside a camera during a timed exposure. With an electronic image sensor, this produces an electrical charge at each pixel, which is electronically processed and stored in a digital image file for subsequent display or processing. The result with photographic emulsion is an invisible latent image, which is later chemically "developed" into a visible image, either negative or positive depending on the purpose of the photographic material and the method of processing. A negative image on film is traditionally used to photographically create a positive image on a paper base, known as a print, either by using an enlarger or by contact printing.

Photography is employed in many fields of science, manufacturing (e.g. photolithography) and business, as well as its more direct uses for art, recreational purposes, and mass communication.

Contents [hide]
1 Etymology
2 History
2.1 Precursor technologies
2.2 Plate photography
2.3 Film photography
2.4 Black-and-white
2.5 Color
2.6 Digital photography
3 Evolution of the camera
4 Technical aspects
4.1 Camera controls
4.2 Exposure and rendering
5 Other photographic techniques
5.1 Stereoscopic
5.2 Full-spectrum, ultraviolet and infrared
5.3 Light field photography
5.4 Other imaging techniques
6 Modes of production
6.1 Amateur
6.2 Commercial
6.3 Art
6.4 Science and forensics
7 Social and cultural implications
8 Law
9 See also
10 References
11 Further reading
11.1 Introduction
11.2 History
11.3 Reference works
11.4 Other books
12 External links
Etymology[edit]
The word "photography" was created from the Greek roots φωτός (phōtos), genitive of φῶς (phōs), "light"[2] and γραφή (graphé) "representation by means of lines" or "drawing",[3] together meaning "drawing with light". The root of photo means "light" while graphos mean "drawing".[4]

Several people may have coined the same new term from these roots independently. Hercules Florence, a French painter and inventor living in Campinas, Brazil, used the French form of the word, photographie, in private notes which a Brazilian photography historian believes were written in 1834.[5] Johann von Maedler, a Berlin astronomer, is credited in a 1932 German history of photography as having used it in an article published on 25 February 1839 in the German newspaper Vossische Zeitung.[6] Both of these claims are now widely reported but apparently neither has ever been independently confirmed as beyond reasonable doubt. Credit has traditionally been given to Sir John Herschel both for coining the word and for introducing it to the public. His uses of it in private correspondence prior to 25 February 1839 and at his Royal Society lecture on the subject in London on 14 March 1839 have long been amply documented and accepted as settled facts.

History[edit]
Main article: History of photography
See also: History of the camera
Precursor technologies[edit]

A camera obscura used for drawing images
Photography is the result of combining several technical discoveries. Long before the first photographs were made, Chinese philosopher Mo Di and Greek mathematicians Aristotle and Euclid described a pinhole camera in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE.[7][8] In the 6th century CE, Byzantine mathematician Anthemius of Tralles used a type of camera obscura in his experiments,[9] Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) (965–1040) studied the camera obscura and pinhole camera,[8][10] Albertus Magnus (1193–1280) discovered silver nitrate,[11] and Georg Fabricius (1516–71) discovered silver chloride.[12] Techniques described in the Book of Optics are capable of producing primitive photographs using medieval materials.[13][14][15]

Daniele Barbaro described a diaphragm in 1566.[16] Wilhelm Homberg described how light darkened some chemicals (photochemical effect) in 1694.[17] The fiction book Giphantie, published in 1760, by French author Tiphaigne de la Roche, described what can be interpreted as photography.[16]

The discovery of the camera obscura that provides an image of a scene dates back to ancient China. Leonardo da Vinci mentions natural cameras obscura that are formed by dark caves on the edge of a sunlit valley. A hole in the cave wall will act as a pinhole camera and project a laterally reversed, upside down image on a piece of paper. So the birth of photography was primarily concerned with inventing means to fix and retain the image produced by the camera obscura.

Renaissance painters used the camera obscura which, in fact, gives the optical rendering in color that dominates Western Art. The camera obscura literally means "dark chamber" in Latin. It is a box with a hole in it which allows light to go through and create an image onto the piece of paper.

The first success of reproducing images without a camera occurred when Thomas Wedgwood, from the famous family of potters, obtained copies of paintings on leather using silver salts. Since he had no way of permanently fixing those reproductions (stabilizing the image by washing out the non-exposed silver salts), they would turn completely black in the light and thus had to be kept in a dark room for viewing.

Plate photography[edit]
Main article: Photographic plate

Earliest known surviving heliographic engraving, 1825, printed from a metal plate made by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce with his "heliographic process".[18] The plate was exposed under an ordinary engraving and copied it by photographic means. This was a step towards the first permanent photograph from nature taken with a camera obscura, in 1826.
Invented in the early decades of the 19th century, photography by means of the camera seemed able to capture more detail and information than traditional media, such as painting and sculpture.[19] Photography as a usable process dates to the 1820s with the discovery of chemical photography. The first medium was photographic plate. The first permanent photoetching was an image produced in 1822 by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce, but it was destroyed in a later attempt to make prints from it.[18] Niépce was successful again in 1825. In 1826 or 1827, he made the View from the Window at Le Gras, the earliest surviving photograph from nature (i.e., of the image of a real-world scene, as formed in a camera obscura by a lens).[20]


World's earliest surviving camera photograph, 1826 or 1827: View from the Window at Le Gras (Saint-Loup-de-Varennes, France)
Because Niépce's camera photographs required an extremely long exposure (at least eight hours and probably several days), he sought to greatly improve his bitumen process or replace it with one that was more practical. Working in partnership with Louis Daguerre, he discovered a somewhat more sensitive process that produced visually superior results, but it still required a few hours of exposure in the camera. Niépce died in 1833 and Daguerre then redirected the experiments toward the light-sensitive silver halides, which Niépce had abandoned many years earlier because of his inability to make the images he captured with them light-fast and permanent. Daguerre's efforts culminated in what would later be named the daguerreotype process, the essential elements of which were in place in 1837. The required exposure time was measured in minutes instead of hours. Daguerre took the earliest confirmed photograph of a person in 1838 while capturing a view of a Paris street: unlike the other pedestrian and horse-drawn traffic on the busy boulevard, which appears deserted, one man having his boots polished stood sufficiently still throughout the approximately ten-minute-long exposure to be visible. Eventually, France agreed to pay Daguerre a pension for his process in exchange for the right to present his invention to the world as the gift of France, which occurred on 19 August 1839.


A latticed window in Lacock Abbey, England, photographed by William Fox Talbot in 1835. Shown here in positive form, this may be the oldest extant photographic negative made in a camera.
Meanwhile, in Brazil, Hercules Florence had already created his own process in 1832, naming it Photographie, and an English inventor, William Fox Talbot, had created another method of making a reasonably light-fast silver process image but had kept his work secret. After reading about Daguerre's invention in January 1839, Talbot published his method and set about improving on it. At first, like other pre-daguerreotype processes, Talbot's paper-based photography typically required hours-long exposures in the camera, but in 1840 he created the calotype process, with exposures comparable to the daguerreotype. In both its original and calotype forms, Talbot's process, unlike Daguerre's, created a translucent negative which could be used to print multiple positive copies, the basis of most chemical photography up to the present day. Daguerreotypes could only be replicated by rephotographing them with a camera.[21] Talbot's famous tiny paper negative of the Oriel window in Lacock Abbey, one of a number of camera photographs he made in the summer of 1835, may be the oldest camera negative in existence.[22][23]

John Herschel made many contributions to the new field. He invented the cyanotype process, later familiar as the "blueprint". He was the first to use the terms "photography", "negative" and "positive". He had discovered in 1819 that sodium thiosulphate was a solvent of silver halides, and in 1839 he informed Talbot (and, indirectly, Daguerre) that it could be used to "fix" silver-halide-based photographs and make them completely light-fast. He made the first glass negative in late 1839.

In the March 1851 issue of The Chemist, Frederick Scott Archer published his wet plate collodion process. It became the most widely used photographic medium until the gelatin dry plate, introduced in the 1870s, eventually replaced it. There are three subsets to the collodion process; the Ambrotype (a positive image on glass), the Ferrotype or Tintype (a positive image on metal) and the glass negative, which was used to make positive prints on albumen or salted paper.

Many advances in photographic glass plates and printing were made during the rest of the 19th century. In 1891, Gabriel Lippmann introduced a process for making natural-color photographs based on the optical phenomenon of the interference of light waves. His scientifically elegant and important but ultimately impractical invention earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1908.

Photographic plates remained the only form of photography for entire 19th century until it was largely superseded by film photography in early 20th century. Plates though remained in use for some specific applications like long-exposure photography for a long time.

Film photography[edit]
Main article: Photographic film

Undeveloped Arista black-and-white film, ISO 125/22°
Hurter and Driffield began pioneering work on the light sensitivity of photographic emulsions in 1876. Their work enabled the first quantitative measure of film speed to be devised.

The first flexible photographic roll film was marketed by George Eastman in 1885, but this original "film" was actually a coating on a paper base. As part of the processing, the image-bearing layer was stripped from the paper and transferred to a hardened gelatin support. The first transparent plastic roll film followed in 1889. It was made from highly flammable nitrocellulose ("celluloid"), now usually called "nitrate film".

Although cellulose acetate or "safety film" had been introduced by Kodak in 1908,[24] at first it found only a few special applications as an alternative to the hazardous nitrate film, which had the advantages of being considerably tougher, slightly more transparent, and cheaper. The changeover was not completed for X-ray films until 1933, and although safety film was always used for 16 mm and 8 mm home movies, nitrate film remained standard for theatrical 35 mm motion pictures until it was finally discontinued in 1951.

Films remained dominant form of photography until early 21st century when advances in digital photography made them largely obsolete. Although 21st century is dominated by digital photography, film continues to be used by enthusiasts and format lovers.

Black-and-white[edit]
Main article: Monochrome photography

A camera store proprietor at Columbus Camera in San Francisco, California,1983.
All photography was originally monochrome, or black-and-white. Even after color film was readily available, black-and-white photography continued to dominate for decades, due to its lower cost and its "classic" photographic look. The tones and contrast between light and dark areas define black-and-white photography.[25] It is important to note that monochromatic pictures are not necessarily composed of pure blacks, whites, and intermediate shades of gray, but can involve shades of one particular hue depending on the process. The cyanotype process, for example, produces an image composed of blue tones. The albumen print process, first used more than 150 years ago, produces brownish tones.

Many photographers continue to produce some monochrome images, sometimes because of the established archival permanence of well-processed silver-halide-based materials. Some full-color digital images are processed using a variety of techniques to create black-and-white results, and some manufacturers produce digital cameras that exclusively shoot monochrome. Monochrome printing or electronic display can be used to salvage certain photographs taken in color which are unsatisfactory in their original form; sometimes when presented as black-and-white or single-color-toned images they are found to be more effective.

Although color photography is dominant, monochrome images are still produced mostly for artistic reasons. Almost all the digital cameras have an option to shoot in monochrome.

Color[edit]
Main article: Color photography

Color photography was possible long before Kodachrome, as this 1903 portrait by Sarah Angelina Acland demonstrates, but in its earliest years the need for special equipment, long exposures and complicated printing processes made it extremely rare.
Color photography was explored beginning in the 1840s. Early experiments in color required extremely long exposures (hours or days for camera images) and could not "fix" the photograph to prevent the color from quickly fading when exposed to white light.

The first permanent color photograph was taken in 1861 using the three-color-separation principle first published by physicist James Clerk Maxwell in 1855. Maxwell's idea was to take three separate black-and-white photographs through red, green and blue filters. This provides the photographer with the three basic channels required to recreate a color image.

Transparent prints of the images could be projected through similar color filters and superimposed on the projection screen, an additive method of color reproduction. A color print on paper could be produced by superimposing carbon prints of the three images made in their complementary colors, a subtractive method of color reproduction pioneered by Louis Ducos du Hauron in the late 1860s.

Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii made extensive use of this color separation technique, employing a special camera which successively exposed the three color-filtered images on different parts of an oblong plate. Because his exposures were not simultaneous, unsteady subjects exhibited color "fringes" or, if rapidly moving through the scene, appeared as brightly colored ghosts in the resulting projected or printed images.

Implementation of color photography was hindered by the limited sensitivity of early photographic materials, which were mostly sensitive to blue, only slightly sensitive to green, and virtually insensitive to red. The discovery of dye sensitization by photochemist Hermann Vogel in 1873 suddenly made it possible to add sensitivity to green, yellow and even red. Improved color sensitizers and ongoing improvements in the overall sensitivity of emulsions steadily reduced the once-prohibitive long exposure times required for color, bringing it ever closer to commercial viability.


A photographic darkroom with safelight
Autochrome, the first commercially successful color process, was introduced by the Lumière brothers in 1907. Autochrome plates incorporated a mosaic color filter layer made of dyed grains of potato starch, which allowed the three color components to be recorded as adjacent microscopic image fragments. After an Autochrome plate was reversal processed to produce a positive transparency, the starch grains served to illuminate each fragment with the correct color and the tiny colored points blended together in the eye, synthesizing the color of the subject by the additive method. Autochrome plates were one of several varieties of additive color screen plates and films marketed between the 1890s and the 1950s.

Kodachrome, the first modern "integral tripack" (or "monopack") color film, was introduced by Kodak in 1935. It captured the three color components in a multilayer emulsion. One layer was sensitized to record the red-dominated part of the spectrum, another layer recorded only the green part and a third recorded only the blue. Without special film processing, the result would simply be three superimposed black-and-white images, but complementary cyan, magenta, and yellow dye images were created in those layers by adding color couplers during a complex processing procedure.

Agfa's similarly structured Agfacolor Neu was introduced in 1936. Unlike Kodachrome, the color couplers in Agfacolor Neu were incorporated into the emulsion layers during manufacture, which greatly simplified the processing. Currently available color films still employ a multilayer emulsion and the same principles, most closely resembling Agfa's product.

Instant color film, used in a special camera which yielded a unique finished color print only a minute or two after the exposure, was introduced by Polaroid in 1963.

Color photography may form images as positive transparencies, which can be used in a slide projector, or as color negatives intended for use in creating positive color enlargements on specially coated paper. The latter is now the most common form of film (non-digital) color photography owing to the introduction of automated photo printing equipment.

After a transition period centered around 1995–2005, color film was relegated to a niche market by inexpensive multi-megapixel digital cameras. Film continues to be the preference of some photographers because of its distinctive "look".

Digital photography[edit]
Main article: Digital photography
See also: Digital camera
In 1981, Sony unveiled the first consumer camera to use a charge-coupled device for imaging, eliminating the need for film: the Sony Mavica. While the Mavica saved images to disk, the images were displayed on television, and the camera was not fully digital. In 1991, Kodak unveiled the DCS 100, the first commercially available digital single lens reflex camera. Although its high cost precluded uses other than photojournalism and professional photography, commercial digital photography was born.

Digital imaging uses an electronic image sensor to record the image as a set of electronic data rather than as chemical changes on film.[26] An important difference between digital and chemical photography is that chemical photography resists photo manipulation because it involves film and photographic paper, while digital imaging is a highly manipulative medium. This difference allows for a degree of image post-processing that is comparatively difficult in film-based photography and permits different communicative potentials and applications.

Digital photography dominates the 21st century. More than 99% of photographs taken around the world are through digital cameras, increasingly through smartphones.


Digital photography is the art and science of producing and manipulating digital photographs — photographs that are represented as bit maps. Digital photographs can be produced in a number of ways:
Directly with a digital camera
By capturing a frame from a video
By scanning a conventional photograph
Once a photograph is in digital format, you can apply a wide variety of special effects to it with image enhancing software. You can then print the photo out on a normal printer or send it to a developing studio which will print it out on photographic paper.
Although the resolution of digital photos is not nearly as high as photos produced from film, digital photography is ideal when you need instant, low-resolution pictures. It's especially useful for photos that will be displayed on the World Wide Web because Web graphics need to be low resolution anyway so that they can be downloaded quickly.


Full Definition of PHOTOGRAPHY

: the art or process of producing images by the action of radiant energy and especially light on a sensitive surface (as film or an optical sensor)
See photography defined for English-language learners
See photography defined for kids
Examples of PHOTOGRAPHY

He studied both film and still photography.
Landscape photography is her hobby.
First Known Use of PHOTOGRAPHY

1839
Other Pictures (on film) Terms

daguerreotype, emulsion, fill, sepia, still, stop


Fine Art Photography
Definition, History, Types

Contents

• What is Fine art Photography?
• History of Technical Developments
• Use of Photography in Art
• Photography as a Fine Art
• Pictorialism (c.1885-1915)
• Sharp Focus Modernism
• 20th-Century Portraiture
• Stieglitz (1924-46)
• Edward Steichen (1946-62)
• John Szarkowski (1962-91)
• Galleries
• Famous Fine Art Photographers
• Collections of Photographic Art
• World's Most Expensive Photographs: Top 16
• Greatest Photographers (Top 200)
• For an explanation of camera terminology, see: Art Photography Glossary.


Venetian Canal (1894)
Photograph by Alfred Stieglitz,
one of the great masters in the
art of photography.

HISTORY OF VISUAL ARTS
For a list of important dates about
movements, styles, famous artists,
up to Post-Modernism, please see:
History of Art Timeline.

What is Fine art Photography?

Known also as "photographic art", "artistic photography" and so on, the term "fine art photography" has no universally agreed meaning or definition: rather, it refers to an imprecise category of photographs, created in accordance with the creative vision of the cameraman. The basic idea behind the genre, is that instead of merely capturing a realistic rendition of the subject, the photographer is aiming to produce a more personal - typically more evocative or atmospheric - impression. One might simplify this, by saying that fine art photography describes any image taken by a camera where the intention is aesthetic (that is, a photo whose value lies primarily in its beauty - see, Aesthetics) rather than scientific (photos with scientific value), commercial (product photos), or journalistic (photos with news or illustrative value). (See also: Is Photography Art?) Artistic photos have been used frequently in collage art (more correctly, photocollage), by artists like David Hockney (b.1937); and in photomontage, by Dadaists like Raoul Hausmann (1886-1971), Helmut Herzfelde (1891-1968) and Hanna Hoch (1889-1979), by Surrealist artists like Max Ernst (1891-1976), by the avant-garde Fluxus group in the 1960s, and by Pop artists like Richard Hamilton. Photos may also be incorporated into mixed-media installation art, and assemblage art. Today, photography is exhibited in many of the best galleries of contemporary art around the world.


Lynching in Marion, Indiana (1930)
A mob of 10,000 whites broke down
the doors at a county jailhouse to
seize these two young negros
accused of raping a white girl.




"Afghan Girl" (1984)
Photographed by Steve McCurry.

History of Technical Developments

Invented in the early decades of the 19th century, camera photography instantly captured more detail and information than traditional methods of replication, like painting or sculpture. The technical evolution of photography was a piecemeal affair, although a major leap was the discovery of light-sensitive emulsions in 1839, which enabled cameras to take black and white photographs. Other important technical advances in the history of photography, included the following.

Photoetching was invented in 1822-5 by the Frenchman Joseph Niepce (1765-1833), who also made the first photograph from nature in 1826. Improvements ( in the reduction of exposure time, the daguerreotype) were found by German Professor Heinrich Schultz (1687-1744) and French physicist Louis Daguerre (1787-1851), in 1837, with Daguerre being responsible for the first ever photograph of a person in 1839. In parallel to this, in 1832, the French-Brazilian artist and inventor Hercule Florence (1804-79) had fashioned a similar process, called Photographie, while the English inventor and pioneer camera expert William Fox Talbot (1800-77) was busy inventing the calotype process, which produced negative images. His 1840s research into photo-mechanical reproduction led to the discovery of the photoglyphic engraving process, the precursor to photogravure. The experimental British scientist John Herschel (1792-1871) invented the cyanotype process and was the first to coin the terms "photography", "negative" and "positive". In 1851, Frederick Scott Archer (1813-57) announced the findings of his research into the wet plate collodion process, which significantly improved the accessibility of photography for the public, as did the American innovator George Eastman's 1884 introduction of roll film as a replacement for photographic plates. In 1908, the French scientist Gabriel Lippmann (1845-1921) was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for his improvements in photographic colour reproduction. The development of the photographic process was studded with such discoveries and inventions, and many other advances in photographic glass plates and printing methods were made during the 19th century.

Victorian exponents included John Edwin Mayall (1813-1901), who snapped some of the earliest photographs of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-79), noted for her photographic portraits and mythological images; and Oscar Gustave Rejlander (1813-75), the Swedish cameraman and photomontage expert who worked with Charles Darwin on The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals.

Twentieth century advances in photographic

18.jpg

technology have been dominated by improvements in film and cinematography, leading to new creative forms such as animation art, cartoons and video art.







Use of Photography in Art

Photography evolved from the camera obscura, an instrument that projected an image through a small hole, allowing the artist to make an accurate tracing of an object or scene. The first mention of its use as a drawing aid appeared in Magia Naturalis, a scientific treatise by the Italian scientist Giambattista della Porta. Many Old Masters from the 17th and 18th century, including Jan Vermeer (1632-75), and Canaletto (1697-1768), are believed to have used it in their sketching.

With the spread of camera-photography from 1840 onwards, the use of photos became common in the production of both portrait art as well as landscape painting. Many figure painters and portraitists began using the new medium of photography in addition to models, to reduce sitting-time. The great 19th century American realist painter, Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), for instance, was an avid user of the camera, who employed photography as part of his pursuit of realism, rather than as a short-cut or aid to composition and perspective. Photography was also employed by landscape artists - notably the French Impressionist painters, as an aid to plein-air painting. For more details, see: History of Art.

Photography as a Fine Art

Although by the late 19th century, photography had become accepted in both Britain and America as a minor visual art - due in part to the promotional efforts of magazines like "American Amateur Photographer", as well as bodies like the "Society of Amateur Photographers", the "Society of Amateur Photographers of New York", the "Photographic Society of Philadelphia", and the "Boston Camera Club" - several photographic artists were keen to show that the new medium could be just as artistic as other types of art, like drawing and painting. Two such artists were Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) and Edward Steichen (1879-1973). Both were instrumental in helping to make photography a fine art, and Stieglitz in particular (and also his wife, Georgia O'Keeffe) was responsible for introducing it into museum collections. A landmark event occurred in 1902, with Stieglitz's formation in America of Photo-Secession, an association of creative photographers, and the publication of its magazine Camera Work (1902-17), which rapidly became a forum for modern art of all types. In 1905, Stieglitz and Steichen founded the "291" gallery in New York, a venue specializing in avant-garde art, notably photographs, paintings and sculptures.



Pictorialism (c.1885-1915)

While Stieglitz and Edward Steichen were doing their best to promote photography as a full-blown art form, Pictorialism - the first major style of photographic art - was becoming high fashion among lens-based artists, around the turn of the century. Pictorialism referred to (typically dreamy, 'soft-focus') photographs that were effectively "created" in the dark room. Instead of recording the image of a particular subject, the photographer manipulated the printing process, in order to create the desired effect. For a pictorialist cameraman, a photograph was something to be manipulated just like a painter manipulated his canvas and palette of paints. Among the most famous pictorial photographers were Man Ray - noted for his rayographs - Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, F. Holland Day, Clarence H. White, William Notman, Sidney Carter, Constant Puyo, Pierre Dubreuil, Heinrich Kuhn, Hugo Henneberg, Ogawa Kazumasa, Harold Cazneaux and John Kauffmann. Although Pictorialism enabled experimental artists like Man Ray to take photography to a new level of creativity, as an art form it proved disappointing, since most of the creativity had little to do with camera work, but involved the manipulation of chemicals and instruments in the dark room. See also the German Dada photomontage artists Raoul Hausmann (1886-1971) and John Heartfield (Helmut Herzfeld) (1891-1968).

For later 20th century artists who have relied on photos as subject matter for their paintings, see: Gerhard Richter (b.1932).

Sharp Focus Modernism

As an influential style, Pictorialism faded after 1920, being superceded by the new idiom of photographic Modernism, as the public began to prefer more sharply-focused images. Despite the disappointment of Pictorialism, photography gained in artistic status from its new sharper-focus, due to the evocative landscape photography of Edward Weston (1886-1958) and Ansel Adams (1902-84), as well as the Precisionism of Charles Sheeler (1883-1965), which he explored in his famous series of photographs of the Ford Motor Co's River Rouge Car Plant in Michigan, and the Cubist-inspired works of Paul Strand (1890-1976). Modern photographers who have continued this tradition include Bernd and Hilla Becher (1931-2007) and (b.1934), the influential husband and wife team who founded the Dusseldorf School, whose followers include the postmodernist camera artist Andreas Gursky (b.1955).

20th-Century Portraiture

In the last decades of the nineteenth century, the photograph began replacing the painting as the modern form of portraiture. During the following century, as camera technology improved, photographic artists extended the medium to embrace a variety of different types of portraits, notably fashion and street portraits, as well as the more conventional formal portraits. Fashion portraiture was pioneered by artists such as: Irving Penn (1917-2009), Helmut Newton (1920-2004), Richard Avedon (1923-2004), Patrick Demarchelier (b.1943), Mario Testino (b.1954), Nick Knight (b.1958), and David LaChapelle (b.1963). Street (or 'genre') portraits were the province of artists like Dorothea Lange (1895-1965), Walker Evans (1903-75), Diane Arbus (1923-1971), and Nan Goldin (b.1953); while more conventional portraits were developed by modernists like Cecil Beaton (1904-1980), Yousuf Karsh (1908-2002), Norman Parkinson (1913-90), Andy Warhol (1928-1987), David Bailey (b.1938) and Annie Leibovitz (b.1949). (Note: Given the widespread use of 'conventional' portraits in the press, many fashion photographers also took formal portraits.) The German-American photographer Hans Namuth (1915-90) introduced a new dynamic approach to portraiture with his photos of the controversial painter Jackson Pollock at work in his studio.

Photojournalism

Now a major branch of modern illustration in newspapers, magazines and online media, news photography has always attracted high calibre camera artists capable of creating a pictorial narrative. Some of the greatest photojournalists include: Robert Capa (1913-54), Larry Burrows (1926-71), Don McCullin (b.1935) and Steve McCurry (born 1950).

Stieglitz: 1924-46

By 1924, Stieglitz's exhibitions and writings in support of photography as an artistic medium were beginning to have an impact. In 1924, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts acquired a collection of 27 of his photographs: it was the first time a major American art museum had included photographs in its permanent collection. Stieglitz himself was consumed by two things: the promotion of Georgia O'Keeffe's art, and also his three hundred or so photographic studies of her - many of which were female nudes - and the promotion of high quality modernist American art, including fine art photography such as the black-and-white lens-based images of Ansel Adams, for whom he put on one of the first shows in 1936. In 1937, the Cleveland Museum of Art held the first major exhibition of Stieglitz's own photography.

Edward Steichen: 1946-62

Stieglitz's partner in "291", Steichen was a photographer for Vogue and Vanity Fair during the period 1923–1938, during which he was the best known and highest paid lens-based artist in the world. After the war, he was appointed Director of the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (MOMA) until 1962. A highly influential figure, he did a huge amount to raise the status of photography among American institutions and the public. In 1955, for instance, he curated the exhibition known as The Family of Man, which toured to 69 countries, and was visited by 9 million people.

John Szarkowski: 1962-91

In 1962, Edward Steichen hand-picked the photographer, curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski (1925-2007) to be his successor as Director of Photography at MOMA, a position Szarkowski held until 1991. Awarded two Guggenheim Fellowships, as well as numerous one-man shows, he published several seminal books, including Looking at Photographs - a practical handbook on how to write about photographs, which is still required reading in the best art schools. A lecturer at Harvard, Yale, Cornell, and New York University, he was one of the most successful advocates of artistic photography.

Galleries

Since the mid-1970s, an increasing number of galleries are beginning to show photographic art. Photographic prints have gradually grown in size, moved from monochrome to colour, and are often printed on blocked canvas without frame or glass, while artist-photographers like Gregory Crewdson and Cindy Sherman exemplify the new trend of staging and lighting of works to maximize their impact. But although now established as an important and innovative medium of contemporary art, photography remains a niche market when compared to traditional fine art painting and sculpture, even if there is a relatively strong demand among art collectors for limited-edition books by individual photographers.

Note: Institutions who are most supportive of photographic art, include, the Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan and the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Aperture Foundation.


Famous Fine Art Photographers

Memorable contributors to photographic fine art include the following.

Man Ray (1890-1976)
American-born Paris-based modernist artist who was an early exponent of both Dada and Surrealism, and showed at the first Surrealist exhibition at the Galerie Pierre in Paris in 1925, along with Jean Arp, Max Ernst, Andre Masson, Joan Miro, and Pablo Picasso. Noted mainly for his avant-garde photography, he also practised as a renowned fashion and portrait photographer, whose subjects included many of the great artists of the day like James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Jean Cocteau and Antonin Artaud. He developed the photographic method of solarization and invented a technique using photograms which he dubbed rayographs (as in his print, Rayograph, 1923, Private Collection). In its review of 20th century visual arts, ARTnews magazine listed Man Ray among the 25 most influential artists, citing his pioneering camera-work and dark room experimentation, together with his exploration of film, painting, sculpture, collage, assemblage, performance and conceptual art.

Ansel Adams (1902-84)
A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, recipient of three Guggenheim fellowships and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, whose black-and-white photographs of the West became the foremost record of the scenery of US National Parks before the advent of tourism. His masterpiece photographic prints include: Storm in Yosemite Valley (1935), Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico (1941), and The Tetons and the Snake River (1942), one of the images on the Voyager Golden Record of human civilization aboard the Voyager spacecraft. Ansel Adams archive resides at the University of Arizona Center for Creative Photography, in Tucson.

Eugene Atget (1857-1927)
French photographer renowned for works documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. He was the subject of a four-volume biography by John Szarkowski and Maria Morris Hamburg.

Walker Evans (1903–1975)
American artist noted for his photographic work for the Farm Security Administration. See also the great Dorothea Lange (1895-1965).

Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908–2004)
Another great French photographer, considered by many to be the greatest "street-photographer" of the 20th century. Influenced in the early 1930s by the street photographer Brassai (Gyula Halasz) (1899-1984).

John Goto (1916-94)
Professor of Fine Art at the University of Derby in England, Goto is a British artist specializing in montage colour photography, who is noted in particular for the "High Summer" pictures in his Ukadia series of photos. His photo digital art has been shown widely in Europe, as well as at solo exhibitions at the Tate Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Photographers' Gallery in London.

Irving Penn (1917-2009)
Best known as one of America's great fashion photographers, he is also noted for his portraits, and still lifes. See also the influential fashion photography of his younger contemporary Richard Avedon (1923-2004), who became the lead camera artist at Vogue and Harper's Bazaar.

Robert Frank (b.1924)
Author of the influential book "The Americans" giving an outsider's view of American society. Highly innovative in compositing and manipulating photographs.

Garry Winogrand (1928-1984)
New York fine arts photographer famous for his portrayal of American life in the early 1960s, and his pictorialization of important social issues. Influenced by Walker Evans, Robert Frank, and to a lesser extent Henri Cartier-Bresson.

William Eggleston (b.1939)
An important pioneer in helping to raise the artistic status of colour photgraphy.

Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-89)
One of the first postmodernist artists, noted for his large-scale, monochrome portraits of celebrities (Andy Warhol, Deborah Harry, Richard Gere, Peter Gabriel, Grace Jones, and Patti Smith), his statuesque male and female nudes, and delicate still-life compositions of flowers, although he was best known for his controversial Portfolio X series of photographs, which brought him instant notoriety due to its explicit content.

Jeff Wall (b.1946)
Probably the most famous exponent of "staged photography", Wall specializes in digital manipulation to create his works. A professor of fine art in Vancouver, he is an important and influential contributor to Canadian postmodernism.

Nan Goldin (b.1953)
Taboo-breaking American camera artist and installationist Nan Goldin, whose works include Nan One Month after being Battered (1984, Tate Museum London), Siobhan in my Bathtub (1992, Winterthur Fotomuseum, Switzerland), and Sisters, Saints, and Sinners (2004, Chapel of Salpetriere, Paris).

Cindy Sherman (b.1954)
New York photographer and film director, recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, famous for her postmodernist art, notably her conceptual portraits. In 2010, Sherman's six-foot tall colour print Untitled #153 (1985), was auctioned by Phillips de Pury & Company for $2.7 million. In 2011, a print of Untitled #96, fetched $3.89 million at Christie's.

Andreas Gursky (b.1955)
One of the best known exponents of large-scale (sometimes digitally manipulated) colour photographs. Favours commercial and financial subjects, as in Schipol (1994, Metropolitan Museum of Art New York), Singapore Stock Exchange (1997, Guggenheim Museum, New York), Parliament (1998, Tate Museum London), and 99 cent (1999).



Collections of Photographic Art

Several of the best art museums around the world have fine art photography departments, including the following:

Art Institute of Chicago
Holds the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, as well as the Julien Levy Collection containing works by Edward Weston, Paul Strand, Andre Kertesz and Eugene Atget.

Detroit Institute of Arts
Home of The Albert and Peggy de Salle Gallery of Fine Art Photography.

Getty Museum, Los Angeles
The West Pavilion houses the museum's collection of fine art photography, featuring original prints dating from 1841, as well as works by modern and contemporary lens-based artists,including: Man Ray, Imogene Cunningham, Walker Evans and the German photographer August Sander.

Guggenheim, New York
Holds the Robert Mapplethorpe Collection (1992) featuring about 200 of Mapplethorpe's best photographs, executed between 1993 and 1998. Includes examples of his early collages, Polaroids, and mixed-media constructions, as well as his celebrity portraits and more than 20 self-portraits.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Holds the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department, with its collection of 6,000 works, focusing on post-1940 photographs.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
The Met's department of photographic art contains 20,000 photographs, prints and daguerreotypes, organized around the Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Walker Evans, and Ford Motor Company collections. Includes a wide range of Photo-Secessionist works as well as contemporary photos from around the world.

MOMA, New York
A thriving photographic art department, built up by Edward Steichen (1946-62), John Szarkowski (1962-91) and Peter Galassi.

Musee d'Orsay, Paris
Its photographic collection comprises some 45,000 photographs, including works by Ferdinand Knopff, Jean Laurent, Man Ray, Stieglitz, Le Secq, Aldolphe Humbert de Molard, Maurice Denis and Roger Fenton.

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
The museum's permanent collection includes photos by Man Ray (1890-76) and Ansel Adams (1902-84); as well as nearly 4,000 photos acquired from Manfred Heiting.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
The museum's collection of fine art photographs includes some 30,000 works, by artists like Paul Strand, Alfred Stieglitz, and others.

Victoria & Albert Museum, London
Its photographic collection totals around 500,000 images from 1839 up to the present day. It features works by Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron, Gustave Le Gray, Frederick Hollyer, Samuel Bourne, Roger Fenton, Curtis Moffat, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Man Ray, Ilse Bing, Cecil Beaton, Bill Brandt, Don McCullin, David Bailey, and Helen Chadwick.

World's Most Expensive Photographs: Top 16

Here is a short list of the world's most highly price photos. For details of the top pictures, see: Most Expensive Paintings: Top 10.

1. Rhein II (1999)
Photographer: Andreas Gursky
Price: $4,338,500
Date: November 2011, Christie's New York

2. Untitled #96 (1981)
Photographer: Cindy Sherman
Price: $3,890,500
Date: May 2011, Christie's New York

3. Dead Troops Talk (1992)
Photographer: Jeff Wall,
Price: $3,666,500
Date: May 2012, Christie's New York.

4. 99 Cent II Diptychon (2001)
Photographer: Andreas Gursky
Price: $3,346,456
Date: February 2007, Sotheby's London

5. The Pond (Moonlight) (1904)
Photographer: Edward Steichen
Price: $2,928,000
Date: February 2006, Sotheby's New York

6. Untitled #153 (1985)
Photographer: Cindy Sherman
Price: $2,700,000
Date: November 2010, Phillips de Pury & Co. New York 7. Billy the Kid (1879–80)
Photographer: Unknown
Price: $2,300,000
Date: June 2011, Brian Lebel's Old West Show & Auction

8. Nude (1925)
Photographer: Edward Weston
Price: $1,609,000
Date: April 2008, Sotheby's New York

9. Georgia O'Keeffe (Hands) (1919)
Photographer: Alfred Stieglitz
Price: $1,470,000
Date: February 2006, Sotheby's New York

10. Georgia O'Keeffe Nude (1919)
Photographer: Alfred Stieglitz
Price: $1,360,000
Date: February 2006, Sotheby's New York

11. Untitled (Cowboy) (1989)
Photographer: Richard Prince
Price: $1,248,000
Date: November 2005, Christie's New York

12. Dovima with Elephants (1955)
Photographer: Richard Avedon
Price: $1,151,976
Date: November 2010, Christie's Paris

13. Nautilus (1927)
Photographer: Edward Weston
Price: $1,082,500
Date: April 2010, Sotheby's New York

14. One (2010)
Photographer: Peter Lik
Price: $1,000,000
Date: December 2010, Private Sale

15. Untangling(1994)
Photographer: Jeff Wall
Price: Australian $1,000,000
Date: 2006, Private Sale.

16. Joueur d'Orgue, (1898)
Photographer: Eugene Atget
Price: $686,500
Date: April 2010, Christie's New York

17. Andy Warhol (1987)
Photographer: Robert Mapplethorpe
Price: $643,200
Date: October 2006, Christie's New York

18. Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico (1948)
Photographer: Ansel Adams
Price: $609,600
Date: April 2006, Sotheby's New York

SOURCE WIKIPEDIA
Ken Thomas is a professional photographer serving Kannapolis, NC. Salisbury, NC. Concord, NC. Landis, China Grove, NC. NC Huntersville, NC Greensboro, NC Wilmington NC. Lexington, NC, High Point, NC. Winston-Salem, NC. Greensboro, NC. Mooresville, NC. Statesville, NC. Badin, NC .Matthews, NC Mint Hill, NC. Monroe, NC. Cornelius, NC. Mt. Airy, NC. Yadkinville, NC Gastonia, NC, Carolina Beach NC, Hilton Head SC, Pageland, SC Myrtle Beach SC, Charleston SC, and all other North & South Carolina cities.